Applebees Testimonial about safety

"Prior to Restaurant Technologies, it was common to hear of accidents that involved hot grease, slick floors and even back complaints due to lifting heavy jugs of oil. Those issues were greatly reduced when we converted to the Restaurant Technologies' system."

Jeff Lingel
Area Director
Applebee's

Improve your kitchen's safety and your employees' satisfaction with a flip of the switch

Safety is not only key to the bottom line, it creates an environment that nurtures employee productivity and satisfaction

60% of Workers' Compensation incidents in restaurants are related to the handling of cooking oil - whether burns, slips and falls or back strains. The OSHA website is full of examples of severe accidents related to manually handling oil. Especially dangerous is the old-fashioned method of emptying the fryer oil (often still as hot as 300 degrees Fahrenheit) into a stockpot, carrying it across often slippery kitchen floors past many other workers and out into the back dock or parking lot area. Along the way, there is potential for spills that can lead to serious burns, spills that create a slip hazard and, in addition, going out into a parking lot, often at night, creates a security risk for the employee and the restaurant. In addition, carrying two to three 35 lb. jugs in boxes (JIBs) can create back strain risk.

Most dangerous of all is using solid oil or shortening. Some operators like it because it is cheap and durable, even though it is unhealthy and full of saturated fats and sometimes even trans fats. However, because it solidifies when it cools down the only way to transport used solid oil is to carry it out back when it is still hot. That creates huge risk on the back end. On the front end, employees need to pack it into the fryer and melt it down, running the risk of the oil spitting and spraying across the kitchen as it melts unevenly.

Restaurant Technologies' closed-loop oil management system allows employees to safely and easily dispose of used oil and fill the fryer with new oil with the flip of a switch. No need to ever carry hot oil again. By creating a safer way to manage a risky and frustrating task, employees feel more engaged and satisfied with their jobs. By eliminating one of the most dangerous restaurant kitchen tasks, employees are no longer at risk for oil-related injuries like slips, falls, and burns.

       

One customer of ours, a major franchisee of a leading QSR brand with over 100 locations, carried out a study with their insurance company. They found that after installing Restaurant Technologies' Total Oil Management system they experienced the following injury claim reductions:

  • Burns from hot oil: 44% reduction
  • Slips and falls: 21% reduction
  • Back strain from lifting: 33% reduction
  • 50%+ reduction in Workers' Compensation claims
  • Increased employee satisfaction
  • Overall dramatic reduction in risk while increasing customer and patron safety.

RT_Safety_Graph

Why automate and remove outdated risky practices in your kitchen?

An automated oil management solution improves physical security by eliminating the need for employees to travel back and forth to the area of the rendering tank to dispose of oil packaging and waste oil. Often, this practice adds unnecessary risk and leaves the back entrance unsecured as employees haul oil containers and oil to the bins.

From an employer's perspective, fewer injuries and security risks translate to better peace of mind that employees are not hurt or victimized, fewer sick days, fewer Workers' Compensation claims, a better overall work environment and improved retention of employees.

Take the first step to reducing the risk in your kitchen today.

Request a zero obligation, on site survey. Let our professional team, show you the benefits of
Total Oil Management

Restaurant Safety

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A troubling safety record

Safety is important in any job, but particularly so in the restaurant industry where young and inexperienced workers abound. In fact, according to the National Restaurant Association, the food service industry is one of the largest employers of teens in the country, and many go on to senior positions. More than half of McDonald’s middle and senior managers started as fry cooks or other entry-level positions, and more than 50 percent of store owners began as crew members in a franchise. The food service industry also has one of the best records of diversity, equity, inclusion, and providing reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities; under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

But the industry has had a troubling safety record. Of the 2.5 million teens working in the restaurant industry, the majority injured on the job are most likely to be working in food service outlets, according to one of the only studies of its kind.

Collecting data from a sample of hospitals across the country over a two-year period, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimated that emergency rooms treated about 44,800 injuries suffered by teenage restaurant workers. Of those injuries, an estimated 28,000 — that's 63 percent — took place in hamburger, pizza, or other food service establishments. Interestingly, most of the injuries occurred in Quick Service Restaurants - hamburger QSR (52.6 percent), as compared to pizza places (12.6 percent) and chicken or fish restaurants (11.7 percent).

The NIOSH study also determined that nearly half of the restaurant kitchen injuries involved hot grease and that more than half of the injuries from falls were caused by wet or greasy floors.

Does your oil handling procedure look something like the video below?

Research shows that you are more likely to be burned

Researchers have also found that teens working in restaurant kitchens are 6 times more likely to be burned than teens working in any other industry. According to the Burn Foundation, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit, teens working as fry cooks in the food services industry are at special risk for burn injuries.

Investigating burns among restaurant workers in Colorado and Minnesota, researchers found that of the 71 teenagers in Minnesota who had had work-related burns, 31 suffered permanent scarring. (Of these injuries, 28 occurred in Quick Service restaurants, and 14 of those accidents involved hot oil and grease.) One 16-year-old crew cook in a Minnesota restaurant outlet was burned over much of his body as he was pushing a container of hot grease outside to filter it. As he reached the door, the container slipped and the lid popped off, spilling the scalding grease all over him.

OSHA Reported Incidents

Employee #1 was preparing to pour hot grease through a filter. As he was bending over, the grease pot slipped out of his hands. When the pot struck the floor, grease splashed onto the employee's face, inner arms and right leg.

Degree of Injury: Hospitalized Injury
Nature of Injury: Burn/Scald ( Hot Oil )
Occupation: Short Order Cook and Food Preparation

Employee #1 was working in a fast food restaurant. The fryer for the French fries needed to be drained of spent cooking oil. The employee regularly assigned to do this task was on vacation. Therefore, a newer employee was assigned to do it. After the employee was given instructions on how to do it, this employee used a 5-gallon plastic pail as a container for the drained spent hot oil instead of the stainless steel pan. The oil was approximately 630 degrees Fahrenheit. The employee claimed that he always saw the regular person use the pail so he thought it was okay to use it as well. The plastic pail melted due to the heat and the oil spilled on the floor. Employee #1 was allegedly told of the spill immediately but slipped and fell as he was leaving the area that had yet to be cordoned off. Employee #1 sustained second-degree burns from the hot oil.

 

Degree of Injury: Hospitalized Injury
Nature of Injury: Burn/Scald ( Hot Oil )
Occupation: Short Order Cook and Food Preparation

Employee #1 was cleaning the chicken fryer in the Deli Department of Grocery / Supermarket. She opened a valve to drain the 300-degree oil from the fryer into an 11-gallon holding pan at the bottom of the fryer. She then removed the oil filled holding pan and placed it approximately 3 ft away. While cleaning the fryer, she inadvertently stepped into the 8 in. deep, by 22 in. long, by 14.75 in. wide, holding pan. Employee #1 was hospitalized for second and third degree burns to her right foot and ankle.

Degree of Injury: Hospitalized Injury
Nature of Injury: Burn/Scald ( Hot Oil )
Occupation: Short Order Cook and Food Preparation

Safer, Smarter Kitchens with the Flip of a Switch

An automated oil management solution improves physical security by eliminating the need for employees to travel back and forth to the area of the rendering tank to dispose of oil packaging and waste oil. Often, this practice adds unnecessary risk and leaves the back entrance unsecured as employees haul oil containers and oil to the bins.

From an employer's perspective, fewer injuries and security risks translate to better peace of mind that employees are not hurt or victimized, fewer sick days, fewer Workers' Compensation claims, a better overall work environment and improved retention of employees.